Students Wow with Production of The 39 Steps

Another school play spectacular

Always show-stopping spectacles which are testament to the creative talent of our students, our school theatre productions go down in North Bridge House history.

This was no different for NBH Senior Hampstead’s Spring term production of The 39 Steps, with weeks of hard work culminating in a two-night stage phenomenon.

A cast of 30 actors were supported by a fantastic backstage crew, equipped by the creative Props Making Club and filmed by our Year 10 photography students. There was an opportunity for everyone, from poster design and ticket sales to sound and lighting, which shone through on the highly praised opening night.

Directed by our passionate Head of Drama, family and friends were impressed with the overall finesse of the show  – especially parents who had dedicated many evenings to the learning of lines and costume sourcing!


Mrs Revie, Head of Drama, NBH Senior School

It has been a pleasure directing such a talented and funny cast since September when I started at North Bridge House Hampstead. We have not stopped laughing throughout our rehearsals. This production has showcased the wonderful talent, dedication and enthusiasm of the students at NBH from years 7 through to 11. I hope you all enjoyed the show.

Cue charity

As with all large community events at North Bridge House, we seized the opportunity to raise money for charity. This time the cast and crew chose to donate all proceeds to Cancer Research UK, contributing to the fight against cancer which has helped double the survival rate over the past 40 years.

Thank you to all family and friends who purchased a ticket to the show and helped to raise a total of £300.

About 'The 39 Steps'

The 39 Steps is a melodrama adapted from the 1915 novel by John Buchan and the 1935 film by Alfred Hitchcock. The original concept and production of a four-actor version of the story was by Simon Corble and Nobby Dimon for the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Patrick Barlow rewrote this adaptation in 2005.

The play centers on our hero, Richard Hannay, his romantic entanglements, and encounters with villains and even the occasional inanimate object. This often requires lightning fast set changes. Thus the film’s serious spy story is played mainly for laughs.